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written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
civil rights to the forefront of that year's presidential campaign. a gunman would assassinate reverent king then two months later, robert f. kennedy was shot and killed on the night he won the california primary. george watson brought us this report back in 1988. 20 years after the king assassination. >> like anybody i would like to live a long life, longevity has its place. but i'm not concerned about that now. i just want to do god's will. and he's allowed me to go up to the mountain, and i've looked over and i've seen the promise land. i mean i'll get there with you. but i want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the promise land. >> reporter: the preacher became the prophet. while standing in tennessee, martin luther king's words rang horribly true. a single gunshot would kill the leader. the shot came from over there. fired from a tiny room it tore into the body of the entire country. rioting broke out. blacks bellowed out theirager in a fire storm of anger and frustration. all this triggered by the murder of a man who preached that freedom would come through nonv
half slave and half free. >> casting nims the mold of the great civil rights leaders he avowed action on series of issue from climate change to immigration reform. became the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address. >> our journey is not complete until our wives, mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to the efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> debt and deficit front and center he offered a vigorous defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and size of the deficit. we reject that they must choose between caring that built the country. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started his day early, with a prayer service at st. john's church. before departing the white house for the longest motorcades known to man for the rise to the capital. a star-studded affair. where else do you see paul ryan mingling with jay-z and beyonce who belted out the national anthem. >> the ceremony was over there was a stream of pomp and
news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
on the civil rights agenda with access to the white house and for congress, all of that was contingent not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: he was very upset on the stands he took because he felt weak handled civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me as i am up for the reelection you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: now will understand what courage it took to take the stand she did, and i understand more about why she hesitated coretta didn't hesitate. she was involved in the entire war movement but she wasn't a public figure so she could send her to a centrally speak for him. >> host: and again history proves dr. king right. >> guest: this is one of the ways in which i think that he is a visionary. i think that he understood the connection between the anticolonial movements that were going on around the world, and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing that we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anticolonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the a
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
did lose. but for king he interested everything he accomplished with civil-rights was the white house and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go in
rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bible, had those of us in lead civil rights organizations, their labor organizations. they're on the platform. not in a guest seat somewhere else, right there only the platform. and martin luther king's son. i mean, i think that he was saying america has changed. and we've got to deal with the change and let's start celebrating the change. >> so, i think he did two things. one, i would agree with you. he said that america is -- has achieved a certain kind of difference that it is different now. but he didn't say i changed it, right? it's that line. s, seneca falls, it is him naming each of the turning point watershed moments in american history in terms of how that change begins to occur. but then he does the thing, of course, that king did in the "i have a dream" speech. he goes all the way back to the initial social contract. he goes back to the nirinitial declaration of independence. he says that the basis of this is in the election, in his right to claim the victory as a ro greszive president. but the real basis for this go
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
that brought them closer to the action than ever. >>> honoring the civil rights leader by hopping on a train, more on that, where that train is going and how you can ride. [ telephone rings ] good evening this is flo. [laughs] yes, i'm that flo. aren't you sweet! licensed phone-ups available 24/7. call 1-800-progressive. >>> good morning, b.a.r.t. is back on time. it was a quick turn around. we could gotten word that may they be experiencing major b.a.r.t. delays. they were dealing with a slight computer problems problem. we just -- problem. they were able to resolve the computer problems quickly. they are on a saturday schedule. it is the martin luther king holiday and a lot of mass transiting including muni, golden gate ferries and ac transit on the east bay, on a typical saturday or sunday schedule. we're still watching this traffic alert. one lane is still blocked northbound 880 approaching washington street. we are really not seeing much of a delay. it's because there's just not as much traffic on the roads. a lot of schools are out. no post
are honoring the civil rights leader played a significant role in advancing american rights, human rights for nonviolence in civil disobedience. until his assassination in 1968. thousands of people, the tributes started with a train ride. this was the annual fee o freedom train. he played a significant roleamerican rights through non-violence, and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual 'freedom train.' >> long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going >> we listened to his speech of viagra tree might think it is pretty amazing. it is history. >> i do not know about everyone else but i did not realize ther
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
. and they paused before this bust of the civil rights leader. the president said this was the first time he'd noticed the king bust among artifacts there and said it was a privilege to use the bible of the civil rights leader in his swearing in ceremony. >> the 24th annual martin luther king junior paradex÷(f held this morning this, is the oldest tribute to king in the east bay. the parade ended with a rally. >> people in san jose honored the late civil rights leader by hopping aboard the annual freedom train. this train ended in san francisco, coming up at 4:55 we'll have a report on other events around san francisco honoring dr. king. >> check out this video shot hours ago by sky 7 hd. that is a surfer near the cliff house. >> strong rip currents caused the surfer to lose his bearings. the coast guard first thought of air lifting him but then decided on a different approach. they told the surfer to jump into the water and jim against crashing waves to rescuers. >> shouldn't have been as far as i was with my buddy. he was a more advanced surfer. called whoever needed to call, and they ca
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
. >> it is a way to educate the young about the past civil rights strag rights -- struggles. and elissa harrington is there with more about how they can learn to ride the ride. >> reporter: this freedom train is to honor the birthday of martin luther king and leaves the station at 9:30. this is the 27th year that the mlk association of santa clara valley has organized this ride from san jose to san francisco. it commemorates his march from selma alabama to the dap toll of montgomery in 1965 and covers 54 miles. this is the longest running freedom train in the united states and the rides were brought about my king's wife. the freedom train today has four stops. again, it will leave san jose at 9:30 and will stop three times along the peninsula in sunnyvale, palo alto and san mateo. round trip tickets are $10 you are advised to come early because lines can get long. live in san jose, elissa harrington. cbs 5. >>> a march and parade will proceed from the caltrains depot. that will be followed by an interface commemoration ceremony. and also in san fran
chartered ride honors martin ruther king jr.'s birthday and his fight for civil rights >> martin king was for civil rights, equal opportunity and peace. >> we have come a long way, but we still have a long way to go. >> cofounder says this is the longest running freedom train in the united states. on its 29th year. >> it is good to have people realize that there are so many other people that also have the concern about having a more racially just society. >> a lianoid san jose's diridon started early. >> had it not been for him making all the steps he made and doing all the things he did, i don't feel like this would be possible. we wouldn't have the freedom we have now. >> speakers on the train tin collude teresa cox and u.s. marshals talked about the impact oned to's world. the route goes for 54 miles, the same distance king and a group of activist marched to the steps of the capital of montgomery campaigning for voting rights. today, the nation's first black president was sworn in for a second term. >> a double sell brought martin luther king h
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
freedom. >> cenk: he connected it to the civil rights and women's rights m. that was a moment today and one you should soak in. there were moments that i thought were--let's just put it this way ironic. >> obama: this generation of americans has been tested by crises that test our resolve and prove our resilience. the decade of war is just ending. >> cenk: only if it were so. there was recently a statement put out that basically the war on terror will continue indefinitely at least for another ten years but probably much longer than that, and by the way we had another drone strike in yemen today as president obama was saying that the war is coming to an end interesting. and then here is the issue of politics and the central theme of the campaign. remember how paul ryan and mitt romney talked about the takers? well the president addressed that. >> obama: we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medi
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
. how did that go? >> congressman and civil rights icon john lewis showed up but they refused to let him speak. >> in which no singular human being >> in which no singular human being is inherently more valuable than any other human being. >> jon: i don't know what to say i'm shocked, jon. they missed a great chance to ask him what martin luther king would think of their movement. we can make king endorse whatever we want. have you seen the commercial are hologram m.l.k. has a dream about telecommunications before >> before you can inspire... we hold these truths to be self-evident >> ... you must first connect and the company that connects more of the world is a leader in communication network >> i may not get to the mountain top of the wi-fi but i will be free at last. >> jon: nicely done. ll be'll be ( cheers and applause ) >> jon: welcome back. my guest tonight is a united states supreme court justice. please welcome to the practice justice sonia sotomayor. ( applause ) there you go. ( cheers and applause ) thank you for joining us. how are you? >> i'm fine. jon: thank you for being
and fail without controversy. understand, a lot of civil rights leaders from that era resist putting the gay rights movement within the civil rights movement. so i think when a lot of this has gone to pass, we will remember the bigness of the gay rights. >> was it a big speech? was it a partisan speech? >> well, it was both. it had elements of boat. let me agree with what cornell said. i couldn't help but notice the man who signed the defensive marriage act, bill clinton, opposed to gay marriage changed his position during the course of his presidency. >> every speech before 2004, looking for a constitution to ban gay marriage. >> i welcome it. what i didn't welcome was the most polarizing president that we had became more polarized. this was a speech for the 51% who voted for him. there wasn't much more for the 49% who did not. it was a speech that talked about collective action by the government and when you look at the biggest issue that we face of this era, it's the deficit. it's the trillion dollars of debt and the president didn't really talk about that. he talked about, we're
. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did not wear a hat or cold and he died 30 days later but he had floats in the parade. there are 2,100 members
inauguration coverage. i'm soledad o'brien. let's get to james clyburn, veteran of the civil rights movement to talk about inauguration day. >> nice to be here. >> our pleasure. we've heard about the two tables th bibles that president obama will be sworn in with. i'm curious to know what you think about the cyclical nature. 50 years ago, march on washington, 50 years later, a black president is being sworn in for a second term. do you -- >> right. >> is it an indication that there have been some big steps toward progress in this country? >> sure. sure. big steps. but many, many steps left to go. all of us are aware that this president came into office, like the 40th year, and a whole lot of things haven't happened, and he is -- he has been met with some really tough times. not just the reaction to him, but because of the challenges that the country faces and i believe that so much of what president obama has confronted was forecast by martin luther king jr. >> what do you mean? >> take health care, for instance. to me, one of the most important speeches ever made by king had to do with heal
honoring their achievements as well. there's a strong civil rights theme running through this parade. >> as there should be. >> as there should be. it is worth taking one last look at that on this inauguration day. >> it's a lot of history right there. a ton of history as we're watching what's going on. we'll take another quick break, resume our special coverage right here in "the situation room." [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! cisco. it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louis
, and the pursuit of happiness. >> dana: before he took the oath, civil rights leader gave the invocation, the first woman to do so and republican senator lamar alexander participated in the ceremony. >> we now stand beneath the shadow of the nation's capitol, whose golden dome reflects the unity and the democracy of one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> today we pray. the american tradition of transferring or reaffirming, immense power in the inauguration of the president of the united states. we do this in a peaceful, orderly way. there is no mob. no coop. no insurrection. this is a moment when millions stop and watch. >> dana: so we are going to two a quick round here and we have other sound to get to. see what "the five" thinks about it. this is a moment you predicted on election day what happened. what are your thoughts overall? >> bob: as a progressive, a great populist speech. it would remind me of what taft would have said and huey long would have said. it is a -- for those of us on the left, it was a reaffirming speech. it was one that, where he underscored what he h
riots in new york city which launched the gay rights movement and linked them to other civil rights struggles. and now that the work is over as you saw a few minutes ago it is party time. coming up we'll get back and give you another insider's look at some of the festivities and preparations to make it happen. >>> the first time in 18 years the 49ers are back in the super bowl. if you were around here in the mid-'90s and 1980s, you know how wild the bay area gets with 49ers fever. this time something totally new for the 49ers and the nfl. you probably know by now, sibling rivalry, two brothers coaching against each other in the super bowl. we have extensive coverage tonight of the super bowl. jim kozemore in our newsroom. we begin with arturo santiago with the family angle. >> reporter: you could say john harbaugh has had bragging rights since they beat the 49ers on thanksgiving day in 2011. now that very same sibling rivalry will be played out on an even bigger stage, the super bowl. >> i feel like there's no losing in that family. and i'm sure the brothers feel the same way. but o
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
: then the ceremonies got underway. the former chair of the naacp and widow of the slain civil rights leader delivered the invocation. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers who taught us to pray, "god, make me a blessing." let their spirit guide us as we claim the spirit of old. there's something within me that holds the reins. there's something within me that banishes pain. there's something within me i cannot explain, but all i know, america, there is something within. there is something within. >> brown: perhaps the most rousing moment of the day came from the brooklyn tabernacle choir singing "battle hymn of the republic." ♪ his truth is marching on ♪ marching on >> brown: and then the first oath taking as supreme court justice sonia sotomayor the first of the president's two appointments to the court swore in the vice president. the musical moment changed when james taylor performed america the beautiful alone on his guitar. ♪ o, beautiful for spacious skies ♪ ♪ for amber waves of grain ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ ♪ above the fruited plains ♪ america, america >> brow
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
to the message of martin luther king jr. on a day that the nation celebrates the birth of the civil-rights leader. >> tahir a preacher say we cannot walk alone the challenges ahead are enormous and the president admitted that his work would be imperfect. we must act that knowing that today's victories will be only partial grammy winner kelly clarkson giving the ceremony in central hollywood. followed by the friend of the president beyonce with her rendition of the national anthem a performance to remember. it all ended with a 21 gun salute before special guests attended a formal luncheon where the president and first lady had lobster, bison and apple pie before they took to the parade route in washington thousands of well-wishers lined the streets screamed and hollered into a magic moment when they got a glimpse of the president and mrs. obama along pennsylvania avenue the first couple had rock star status. hand-in-hand to the crowd went wild. one of the more emotional moments of the day action likely when president obama was just leaving the capital take a look he stopped and he turned around
an event that took place outside of this building. the passage of the historic civil rights laws. we are honored to have witnessed a colleague, congressman john lewis was a speaker at that historic march. >> [applause] >>shows the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about so we all can recognize a. you >> [applause] >> behind us the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is niagara falls. painted in 1856. never fails to inspire a tremendous offer the natural beauty of our great country. then and now the mighty fall symbolizes the grandeur, power and possibility of america. i want to thank my former senate partner are a great secretary of state hillary clinton for allowing us to borrow this beautiful paintings from the state department collection. frankly we are not here for the paintings. we're here for the food. the theme of today's ceremony is based in america's future, today is a menu. from the new england lobster to the heirloom decibels, the south dakota bison, the wonderful new york lines. it was actually chosen by the tasting com
on the same day the nation pauses to remember civil rights legend and icon dr. martin luther king jr.. two men, two very different dreams forever linked. it is monday january 21st inauguration day and good morning. thank you for joining fox 5 special coverage. i'm allison seymour. >> i'm tony perkins. we are broadcasting from our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy. it's a beautiful building and a beautiful view. we are blocks from where all the accident gets underway. we will bring it all to you live all morning long as we mentioned earlier. this is president obama's 4th oath of office. he took his third yesterday. we'll show you a little bit of that. >> chief justice john roberts administered the oath. the president has two swearing in ceremonies because inauguration day fell yesterday. he had two of the first time around because he and justice roberts flood their lines during the public ceremony. >> vice president joe biden was also sworn in yesterday morning just as he administered his oath at the naval observatory. >> today's oaths will take place just before the noon h
, they remember the fight and struggle led by martin luther king and other people during the civil rights era to break through america's history of racism, of segregation, of people being marginalized. king lead to a lot of what we know now as historic legislation, the civil rights act, the voting rights act, the fair housing act. so there is a legacy that king left the benefit it and created the conditions under which president obama could even be elected to you do not have the voting rights act, you do not have black elected officials did you do not have the black vote -- a voting turnout that ultimately becomes critical in the 1990's, 2000, and of course in 2008, even in 2012. there is a long legacy. president obama himself acknowledges that he stands on those shoulders. not just the shoulders of former presidents that he talks about, but also the civil rights leaders. so it is significant that this is being held on martin luther king's holiday. and, of course, he is the president that is there when the martin luther king memorial actually comes about and is put up here in washington, d.c.
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
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